Walmart Pick-Up App

This will be a relatively short post, but it will just be my little review of the Walmart pick-up app. I’d mentioned it before in the posts I’d made when I was feeling sick about how this app seemed promising when it came to my idea of avoiding too much interaction with other people when it isn’t necessary, not that I want to be antisocial and avoid people, but rather because the more people I’m around the more chances that I also give myself to catch something like a cold. Since those posts I’ve tried the app twice and I like it quite a bit thus far.

I can just pick my “favorite” items that I buy regularly like dog food, printer ink, antibacterial wipes, etc. so it makes things even quicker and easier. Also the app gives you the option of store pick up where an associate takes the items to you to your car or the delivery option where the items are delivered to your house. I always do the pick up one because my family and I avoid having strangers come to our house, we don’t even have pizza delivered just as a safety precaution we take.

For now I’ve gotten over my cold and will hopefully not catch anymore, so far the precautions that I’ve enacted to avoid catching a cold and to get better from a cold have worked decently well. This is just my little review that I definitely recommend giving the app a try if you’re interested or just curious.

Perspective

“I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”

Thomas Edison

This post is mostly for myself, a small reminder for myself to always return to regarding my view on life which has changed quite a good deal since I was younger. In my youth I was in more of a state of mind of instant gratification, instant reward. In my mind, if I saw no results immediately, then it must be that the matter at hand must not be worth any effort because of the lack of immediate results, but now I think that all good things take time and effort.

I may jump around every which direction in this short post, but I know where I’m jumping, so you can follow or you can read this post with some sense of bewilderment, either way it’s okay, my mind can be a little flighty at times, but it’s of no great concern.

This is the part where I get a bit flighty and kind of jump from idea to idea:

With regard to the picture accompanying this post, it’s to signify the same general idea with regards to effort. This has to do with a concept that I like and it is the grassroots movement, the grassroots movement doesn’t relate to a single historical movement, but rather a general type of movement. The definition given on the site www.dictionary.com is: “the common or ordinary people, especially as contrasted with the leadership or elite of a political party, social organization, etc.; the rank and file”. I am just this “ordinary” and “common”, so if I expect to ever make the kinds of progress that I hope to make in my life I may as well be well aware beforehand of the grit and determination it will take on my part and know that my goals are going to require an uphill climb, but this early awareness will make the hard work more bearable.

I can’t find the direct source of the next quote, but it still relates to success and hard work, this time it comes in the form of a sort of story about Chinese bamboo:

“You start with a little seed, plant it, and water it for a whole year, but nothing happens. The second year you water it, again, nothing happens. The third year you water it, and still no signs of your effort. How frustrating! If you stayed consistent and continued to water it into the fifth year, the tree finally sprouts and grows up to ninety feet in six weeks!

The improvement process is much like the Chinese bamboo tree; it is often discouraging, but great things happen if you remain persistent when you aren’t seeing results. If it seems like all your hard work isn’t adding up right now–be patient and keep watering the bamboo.”

I get frustrated with my goals sometimes and discouraged, but these sorts of little reminders help me soldier on and this post is a way to keep all these different ideas all relating to my view of success and effort all in one place as a source for some gentle reminders that success takes time and effort to achieve.

 

EKG and ACLS Review: Rhythms

IMG_1876.jpgFirst things first.

Before I even review what the important rhythms are, I’ll review the basic reading of the rhythms.

So with regards to time:

  • One box is equal to 0.04 seconds
  • 5 boxes add up to 0.2 seconds
  • And 75 boxes together equate to 3 seconds

 

IMG_1877.jpgNext is a review of the waves that are seen on the EKG rhythms:

  • First is the P wave, which under normal circumstances should be upright
  • Next is the QRS interval, the Q wave is a negative deflection, the R is a positive deflection, and the S is another negative deflection
  • Third is the upright T wave
  • And last is a U wave in some cases

 

These diagrams and descriptions are extremely basic and don’t go into too great of detail. For this information I mainly referred to a PDF I found online from a copy of ECG Interpretation Made Incredibly Easy 5th Edition I have no idea if this copy has been posted online without violation of any copyrights, I just googled “ECG for Dummies” and this was one of the sources that came up so I can’t guarantee that it will always be made available forever, but in the meantime it’s there.

Next I’m going to review the rhythms that we’re required to be able to recognize according to ACLS guidelines, the list given in the manual from the American Heart Association includes the following:

  • Sinus Rythm
  • Atrial fibrillation and flutter
  • Bradycardia
  • Tachycardia
  • Atrioventricular (AV) block
  • Asystole
  • Pulseless electrical activity (PEA)
  • Ventricular tachycardia (VT)
  • Ventricular fibrillation (VF)

IMG_1878.jpg

The images above are of rhythms that I traced from the American Heart Association’s ACLS manual.

Those rhythms are also some of the most confusing rhythms for me because all any of it looks like to me are squiggles and it confuses my brain to try and make out one type of squiggle from another type of squiggle.

I may still be wrong now, but perhaps I finally understand to some small degree some of the differences in these rhythms.

In the case of v-fib there is no particular rhyme or reason to the rhythm, it really is just squiggles, on the other hand the v-tach, which can either be monomorphic or polymorphic has more of a pattern to it (in the case of the monomorphic form it has a singular appearance in its pattern whereas in the polymorphic form the pattern varies to some degree).

IMG_1883.jpg

Next I’ll review pulseless electrical activity which has a sort of broad definition being that the rhythm is organized, but that no pulse can be detected. The list of pulseless electrical activity that is provided in the ACLS manual includes:

  • Idioventricular rhythms
  • Ventricular escape rhythms
  • Postdefribrillation idioventricular rhythms
  • Sinus rhythm

IMG_1885.jpg

This most recent image is of the various types of AV blocks. The main resource I used for this is the Youtube video: AV Blocks (1st, 2nd, and 3rd Degree).

All the AV blocks are also forms of bradycardia and since I’m on the topic of bradycardia I will add the signs and symptoms of symptomatic bradycardia since knowledge of them is useful to me in my work as a bedside nurse:

Symptoms include chest discomfort or pain, shortness of breath, decreased level of consciousness, weakness, fatigue, light-headedness, dizziness, and presyncope or syncope.

Signs include hypotension, drop in blood pressure on standing (orthostatic hypotension), diaphoresis, pulmonary congestion on physical examination or chest x-ray, frank congestive heart failure or PE, and bradycardia-related (escape) frequent premature ventricular complexes or VT. (Donnino et. al: 122)

I won’t do much review on tachycardia, but I will quote another section of the ACLS manual regarding symptomatic tachycardia because once again, this information is pertinent to my work and care as a bedside nurse:

  • Hypotension
  • Acutely altered mental status
  • Signs of shock
  • Ischemic chest discomfort
  • AHF

Last of the rhythms that I’ll review are a-fib and a-flutter.

IMG_1886.jpg

Source(s):

“The ACLS Cases.” ACLS PROVIDER MANUAL, 2016, by Michael W Donnino et al, American Heart Association, 2016, pp. 122 and 131.

 

 

 

 

 

 

DIY: Pumpkin Bouquet (Easy)

So here I go with the 1 hour limit, plus I’ll likely not add any additional posts in the next few days since I’ll be working, but this post will be where I’ll be getting a little Pinterest-y/Martha Stewart-y on this blog. I saw a post on Pinterest at some point in time of a pumpkin bouquet and I found it really cute and so I thought that I’d give it a shot.

What I used for my bouquet was: a bouquet of flowers, one appropriately sized pumpkin, a large cup, paper towels, some fake moss (optional), and a little elbow grease.

Step 1: Buy flowers and pumpkin, fake moss optional.

Step 2: Cut and clean pumpkin using elbow grease, the top of the pumpkin can be discarded since it’s not used in this DIY. Also, I added an extra step for myself with washing the pumpkin inside and out with a bleach and water solution to slow the rate in which it would naturally rot.

Step 3:IMG_1835.JPG Take the large water cup and fill close to the top with water, then place cup in the center of the hollowed pumpkin. Put folded paper towels under cup for balance and between the glass and pumpkin edges for support as well.

 

IMG_1836.JPGStep 4

Trim flowers to fit container and arrange as desired.

This next part is where you can use fake moss if you wish, I used it to fill the little gaps between the pumpkin and the cup to give it a neater more professional look.

Step 5

Find a home for your pumpkin bouquet, as a table centerpiece or in any other place in your home and enjoy your fall creation.

Rule #3: Blog No Longer than 1 Hour Each Day

I’m taking to liking blogging a good bit. I do enjoy it more than I imagined I would and this is the point of my rule #3, to set limits for myself. Just as I don’t like to overdo social media, I’d also prefer to keep myself from overdoing this as well. This is more of a general guideline for myself of more-or-less spending no longer than one hour each day blogging, seeing to it that an hour is a relatively adequate amount of time to write. I’ve broken this rule already, but then again I’ve just made it at this moment so I’m not sure that it would even really count. It will count tomorrow though and henceforth.

Rule #2: Buy Comfortable Shoes

Maybe I’ll be seen as boring for making this rule for myself, but my second rule for myself is to buy only comfortable shoes, the reason being that: I’d rather have happy feet that will last me many years to come rather than suffer in my later age with things like plantar fasciitis. I’d rather look imperfect in the shoes I wear today and be able to run and jump and be pain free tomorrow. Some shoes allow us to meet in the middle and manage to serve both form and function, so it isn’t to say that I can only buy unattractive shoes, all the shoes I buy can look nice as long as they’re also comfortable. I’m not going to force myself to go out and replace all my shoes all at once, but rather to keep this rule in mind each time I’m ready to buy new ones. So for shoes: function before aesthetic. So converse, my old friend, so long you attractive but poorly supported shoe and no more hard soles or overly high heels for me either (at least none of the high heels with the steep angles that arch my foot too much).

Rule #1: Restriction of Clothing Purchases

Don’t buy any new clothes until clothes that have been selected to go to donation have been donated and until any other existing new clothing purchases have been washed and stored. When there’s no longer clothes left to be sent to donation and when all new clothes have been washed and stored it’s okay to make new clothing purchases again.